The Fujitsu Futro S400: Your Mini-Server Solution for Home Use


Software • by Sven Reifschneider • 23 October 2013 • 6 comments
#linux #howto
Please note that this article is dated and may no longer be relevant with current Debian versions or modern hardware. For low-performance requirements, even a Raspberry Pi is now a viable option.

Many people desire a small server at home for various purposes. Some use it for downloading large files without keeping their main computer on all night, others for local website testing, setting up personal applications, home automation, media sharing within a network, or establishing a NAS without a hefty investment. Utilizing an old PC can be power-inefficient, while purchasing an ITX computer can be costly. The solution? A quiet, small, low-power device that can handle basic tasks without sending your electricity bill skyrocketing, all at a reasonable price.

What is a Thin Client?

A thin client is a compact, small PC, typically used in businesses that require basic computing power to access a server. It's often just used as a terminal or runs minimal task-specific software. You've likely seen these slim boxes in many furniture stores. A popular model is the IBM Netvista N2200, commonly used as a hardware firewall, as was the case in my personal experience. However, it offers limited performance and outdated ports. I wanted a slightly more powerful device, preferably completely passive, initially for a hardware firewall using IPFire. After extensive research in forums, I discovered the Fujitsu Futro S400. This is an older thin client series available at a bargain, with current offers around €19.99. A capable machine for just €20 - that's brilliant!

The Fujitsu Futro S400

This sleek, little device stands upright, taking up minimal space. It comes with an external power supply, eliminating even the need for a power supply fan. It does produce some heat, but that’s hardly an issue. When placed openly, it’s barely noticeable. Only in confined spaces, like in a cabinet as in my setup, does the top of the cabinet get mildly warm. As for its specs:

  • 1 GHz AMD Processor
  • Maximum 60 Watts
  • Height: 25cm
  • 256 / 512 MB RAM
  • Storage via CF card
  • 4x USB ports (2x USB 2.0, 2x USB 1.1 in my case)
  • VGA, RS-232, Parallel, PS/2 ports
  • 1 PCI slot with riser card
  • Gigabit Ethernet
  • 1 IDE slot

While it's not the fastest or most modern device, it's perfectly adequate for a small Linux server handling non-intensive processes. The use of a CF card adds flexibility and affordability to the setup. In my case, a spare 4GB CF card works fine, with about 2GB left free after installing the operating system and various programs/scripts.

Device and Linux Installation

As the S400 is purchased used, it generally comes with all necessary components. Just add a CF card, such as a Transcend 16GB CF card. Insert it, connect the power (RAM is usually included), and you're set to go. A great feature of the S400 is its ability to boot from USB, so just connect an external DVD drive, insert a Linux installation CD, and start the installation. In the BIOS (accessed by pressing delete, F1, or F2 during boot, depending on the model), ensure USB boot is enabled and the boot order is correct. I chose Debian Linux for its reliability and because the latest installer CD is always at hand. The installation process is straightforward, like installing on any hard drive. I selected only the basic installation, Web, SQL, SSH, and file server packages, omitting graphical interfaces and other unnecessary features to save space. Following the installation guide, you’ll eventually have a fully functional Debian Linux system running on the CF card.

Next Steps

With the server set up and running quietly, you can access it via SSH. Windows users can use puTTY (simply enter the IP address; the standard port is 22). Mac users can open Terminal (Applications -> Utilities -> Terminal) and type: ssh 192.168.0.5 (replacing with your server's IP address). In the second part of this series, I’ll show how to set up an affordable mini-NAS with an external hard drive on this small Debian server.

As you can see in the title image, it fits perfectly in a cabinet designed for two levels of file folders, making it easy to integrate into any space. Sure, there are smaller Mini-ITX computers with Wi-Fi and other features, but not at this price point if you're looking for an affordable, DIY solution.

Usage

root@s400:~# cpufreq-info
cpufrequtils 008: cpufreq-info (C) Dominik Brodowski 2004-2009
Report errors to [email protected].
analyzing CPU 0:
Driver: powernow-k7
The following CPUs run at the same hardware clock speed: 0
The clock speed of the following CPUs is software-coordinated: 0
Maximum duration of a clock speed change: 200 us.
Hardware limits of clock frequency: 667 MHz - 1000 MHz
Possible clock frequencies: 667 MHz, 800 MHz, 1000 MHz
Possible governors: powersave, userspace, conservative, ondemand, performance
Current policy: The frequency should be within 667 MHz and 1000 MHz.
The "ondemand" governor may decide any frequency within this range.
Current clock frequency is 667 MHz (verified by hardware query).
Statistics: 667 MHz:99.36%, 800 MHz:0.03%, 1000 MHz:0.61% (12)

To my knowledge, I've never had issues with the processor running at 100%. In idle state (with only SQL, Apache, etc., running), the processor is barely utilized, resulting in the following readings:

root@s400:~# cat /proc/loadavg
0.05 0.05 0.05 1/119 2867

root@s400:~# cat /proc/meminfo
MemTotal: 221976 kB
MemFree: 71236 kB

Share this post

If you enjoyed this article, why not share it with your friends and acquaintances? It helps me reach more people and motivates me to keep creating awesome content for you. Just use the sharing buttons below to share the post on your favorite social media platforms. Thank you!

Sharing illustration
Donating illustration

Support the Blog

If you appreciate my work and this blog, I would be thrilled if you'd like to support me! For example, you can buy me a coffee to keep me refreshed while working on new articles, or simply contribute to the ongoing success of the blog. Every little bit of support is greatly appreciated!

Bitcoin (Segwit):3FsdZmvcwviFwq6VdB9PZtFK827bSQgteY
Ethereum:0x287Ffa3D0D1a9f0Bca9E666a6bd6eDB5d8DB9400
Litecoin (Segwit):MD8fMGDYtdeYWoiqMeuYBr8WBPGKJxomxP
Dogecoin:DTA6gkDCp1WncpoFJghzxCX7XPUryu61Vf
Sven Reifschneider
About the author

Sven Reifschneider

Greetings! I'm Sven, a tech-savvy entrepreneur and dedicated photographer, located in the scenic Wetterau, close to the vibrant Frankfurt / Rhein-Main area. This blog serves as a nexus for my eclectic pursuits, a platform where I channel my expertise and intellectual curiosity into compelling narratives.

In my professional life, I steer Neoground GmbH, providing not just AI consulting but a gamut of digital solutions — from web development to creating our own SaaS products. With a background rich in tech proficiency, I consider myself not merely an IT specialist but an advocate for community-driven innovation and systemic change.

Beyond the tech world, my lens has been my artistic ally for years, capturing everything from intimate moments to grand celebrations. This blog converges these two realms — where tech-savviness meets artistic intuition, aiming for holistic excellence. I invite you to explore a myriad of topics that not only echo my own aspirations for transformative change but offer insights drawn from a breadth of experience.


6 comments

Add a comment

You can use **Markdown** in your comment. Your email won't be published. Find out more about our data protection in the privacy policy.

18 Jun 2014, 23:26
Sven

Als ich den Futro S400 mit 2 Netzwerkkarten und IPFire in Betrieb hatte, habe ich einige male den Stromverbrauch gemessen. Dieser war meist bei circa 20 Watt, was sich auch mit deinen Angaben von anderen Besitzern deckt.
Jetzt mit Debian + externer Festplatte als Samba Share komme ich wenn ich mich recht entsinne auf 20 – 25 Watt.
Somit amortisiert sich das Gerät bei dir wohl relativ schnell, da du 50 Watt sparst.

18 Jun 2014, 22:00
Alexander

Vielen Dank Sven !
Das Ergebnis ist supergut für mich.
Bei meiner derzeitigen Konfiguration verweigert IPFIRE den Treiber powernow-k7 für den Geode zu laden, deswegen läuft er ständig auf 1000 MHz obwohl ich für das System eine durchschnittliche CPU Auslastung von 4% habe. Nebst anderen Problemen (uralt Netzteil u.s.w.) saugt meine Konfiguration deswegen 70 Watt aus dem Netz, und mein IPFIRE läuft 24/7.
Laut Angaben von anderen Besitzern des Futro braucht dieser irgendwo zwischen 15 und 25 Watt, ich kann also bei Anschaffung eines Futro S400 mit einer Stromersparnis von knapp 50 Watt rechnen. Damit macht sich der Kauf binnen kurzer Zeit von selbst bezahlt.
Nochmals vielen Dank, hast mir sehr weitergeholfen !!

18 Jun 2014, 17:14
Sven

Klar, kein Problem.
Ich habe gestern Abend den S400 neu aufgesetzt, die Daten entstammen also einem paar Stunden alten Debian 7.0. Siehe Ergänzung im Artikel.

lg Sven

17 Jun 2014, 21:55
Alexander

Hallo Andi,

ich bin nach wie vor mit meinem S400 zufrieden, nutze ihn aber nicht regelmäßig, hauptsächlich zum testen von Webprojekten mit Webserver, SQL und PHP auf ner ausgelagerten /var Partition auf nem 8GB USB-Stick.
Der Futro S400 hat ja ein 1 Gbit-Interface, dementsprechen hat man ja im Idealfall bis zu 1 Gigabit pro Sekunde. Bevor ich mein Netzwerk auf 1000MBit umgestellt habe, waren es bei mir auch nur so 11-12MB/s, was aber am Netzwerk lag. Mit 1000MBit/s fällt dies jedoch weg und ich habe die Limitierung von USB 2.0. Ich erreiche im Alltag jedoch meist so 14 – 18 MB/s, je nachdem, was sonst noch über die Leitungen läuft. Reicht hauptsächlich aus und Backups laufen eh im Hintergrund, da stört es mich nicht, ob die 1 oder 4 Stunden dauern.

Ein Teamspeak-Server läuft auf dem S400 übrigens auch fehlerfrei, vor paar Tagen mal getestet.

lg Sven

15 Dec 2013, 15:10
Sven

Hallo Andi,

ich bin nach wie vor mit meinem S400 zufrieden, nutze ihn aber nicht regelmäßig, hauptsächlich zum testen von Webprojekten mit Webserver, SQL und PHP auf ner ausgelagerten /var Partition auf nem 8GB USB-Stick.
Der Futro S400 hat ja ein 1 Gbit-Interface, dementsprechen hat man ja im Idealfall bis zu 1 Gigabit pro Sekunde. Bevor ich mein Netzwerk auf 1000MBit umgestellt habe, waren es bei mir auch nur so 11-12MB/s, was aber am Netzwerk lag. Mit 1000MBit/s fällt dies jedoch weg und ich habe die Limitierung von USB 2.0. Ich erreiche im Alltag jedoch meist so 14 – 18 MB/s, je nachdem, was sonst noch über die Leitungen läuft. Reicht hauptsächlich aus und Backups laufen eh im Hintergrund, da stört es mich nicht, ob die 1 oder 4 Stunden dauern.

Ein Teamspeak-Server läuft auf dem S400 übrigens auch fehlerfrei, vor paar Tagen mal getestet.

lg Sven

15 Dec 2013, 14:59
Andi

Hallo Sven,

ein wirkliches tolles Projekt. ThinClients sind meiner Meinung nach die beste Möglichkeit um einen, sowohl in der Anschaffung als auch im Betrieb günstigen, Homeserver zu betreiben. Ich bin auch gerade dabei einen S400 zu erwerben damit ihn dann später ein Freund als Homeserver nutzen kann. Ich persönlich habe mit einem Igel 4210 als Homeserver angefangen, bin aber, aufgrund erhöhter Anforderungen, auf einen HP Microserver N54L umgestiegen.

Mich würde aber dennoch interessieren welche Datenrate du mit z.B. einer externen Festplatte am US B 2.0 über das Netzwerkinterface letztendlich bekommst. Bei meinem Igel 4210 war damals leider bei 12 MB pro Sekunde Schluss, der hatte nur ein 100 Mbit-Interface.

Gruß und frohes Basteln.
Andi